Chronarchy (chronarchy) wrote,
Chronarchy
chronarchy

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Eliade and Jung will destroy your mind!

I realized recently that we scholarly people like to do something strange.

Fluff-Bunny Newbie: What's a good book on Paganism? How do I learn about my religion?

Scholarly Pagan with Ego: Read Eliade's Myth of Eternal Return. You'll understand things better. Or Joeseph Campbell's Hero with 1,000 Faces. Or get yourself some Jung. And don't call him Jung, call him Young.

FBN: This will make me a better Pagan?

SPE: Of course! You'll know about the collective unconscious! You'll understand how myth is an expression of primordial time. You'll see how there are no original myths.

FBN: Oh. Is that what Paganism is about?

SPE: Well, no. It's about personal experience.

FBN: But why am I reading this then?

SPE: Because they're important. It gives you tools to talk about your religion.

FBN: But I don't know what my religion is about! How will I talk about things I don't have an experience of? It'd be like having a hammer and no nails!

SPE: I use my hammer all the time. In fact, I'm using it now to make my point to you.

FBN: Oh, I see. I'm going to go back to being Christian. Thanks anyway.

SPE: [muttering under breath] Obviously, FBN wasn't cut out to be Pagan anyway.

Why do we do this? Shouldn't our first recommendation be: Go out into the woods, sit there, and wait for something to happen. If nothing happens, pretend it did, because that's just as valid as anything else out there. ?

I think we're messed up, and we need to re-think things.

Besides, pointing people to Jung and Eliade is just going to mess them up.
Tags: reflections
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