March 31st, 2009

surya

Ah, marketing bloggers

Looks like my mention of the Cheeseburger in Paradise restaurant in Columbus, OH, caught the eye of someone in CiP Corporate.

Read their comment in response to my post.

I'm somewhat amused. . . the "libations" have improved, apparently, but no mention of the central issue I had, the cheeseburger, is made.

I do suspect I'll try CiP again. . . a lot can happen in a couple of years in the restaurant business, and Casey will be getting a note back from me (I'm sure that my reply to the comment left won't make it back, since it was "anonymous"). I was thinking about headed back before the comment appeared (actually, while I was writing the post).

I'm highly amused at the way advertising and marketing has gone all bloggy recently, from the (usual) spam to the more targeted commenting (like this). Restaurants and airlines have their own blogs these days, some masquerading as customers with perpetually glowing experiences and some being honest about who they are and who pays them.

Of course, it all gives me a mixed response: social networking wasn't designed for advertising, but it sure is becoming the most heavily-used vehicle for it. I suspect it has something to do with too many young professionals, fresh out of college, who think that the cutting-edge tools are the way to go in all things. . . it begins to form an unbalanced marketing plan, though, I tend to think, especially with the cost of advertising on something like FaceBook or MySpace. . . compared with the annoyance that customers feel toward your advertisement. Still, these advertising schemes work, it seems, as people continue to use them.

Besides, how else are you going to manage to sell "McCafé," "Bob-b-Que," "Vanilla Frosties," "BOBurritos," or any of a million other mis-branded items to skeptical customers? If only the McPizza had had blog and social networking support, it might still be around.