Chronarchy (chronarchy) wrote,
Chronarchy
chronarchy

An update on yesterday's find.

Here is the entire source:

934) P. 123, n° 154; photo, fig. 9. Fragment de stèle de marbre blanc, brisée de tous côtés, sauf à g. : 28 x 20 x 5,5 cm. Le fronton triangulaire était orné de trois rosaces et soutenu par deux colonnes. Ch. ép. sur le bandeau supérieur : 4 x 12 cm. Provient de la nécropole occidentale.

Peregrinus [---] | quod Esus iuben[s---].

Peregrinus est un nom très courant. Plus surprenante est l'intervention du dieu gaulois Esus.

I managed to find it when the curator of the Center of Epigraphy here contacted me back. We went back and forth via email, and eventually she found the source for me and I went over and picked it up after lunch.

You'll note that a picture is mentioned. The picture is located in the Bulletin d'Archéologie algérienne, in one of the following two articles:

J. MARTIN, Extrait du catalogue des inscriptions latines du bassin de l'Isser et de l'oued Sebaou, BAA, t. VII, 1, 1977-1979, p. 69-86.

Or Ph. LEVEAU, Nouvelles inscriptions de Cherchel, BAA, t. VII, 1, 1977-1979, p. 111-192
My money is on it being in the second one, personally. I've asked for both, though. The curator is looking into getting the second article for me (we already have the first, but I haven't put my hands on it yet).

I am also excited, though, because I may possibly have found a facsimile copy of the original Berne Commentaries (aka the Berne Scholia) in our local library. I'll be headed over there today to pick it up. There's another promising book, printed 1728, in the rare books section, but that section is closed until July.

I had meant to grab a couple of books that refer to the Berne Commentaries to see what source they cite, but I forgot when I was home at lunch. So now, instead, I'll just sort of wing it and hope that I have, indeed, found the source that they all cite.

After all, I'm not entirely sure that the people citing the Commentaries have actually read them. . . Much like Bober's work on Cernunnos: it's constantly cited, but no one seems to have read it.

Research is exciting. Perhaps I am a geek, but there's nothing cooler than finding something like this.

Thank you to all those who looked around for the article in question. I'm very happy to say that that one was found.

There are a few more citations I need to track down, including inscriptions in Florence, Italy; Pfalsbourg, Germany; and I hear tell that there's one more, but I don't have a location on it yet. Those citations, though, will have to wait until I find the commentaries and study up on the Chercel, Algeria, inscription.
Tags: deities, esus, piety
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